Provision for school-aged children (3-19)

School-age children who are deafblind or have sensory impairments may be educated at a variety of facilities:

  • A young person interacts with an older woman at a schoolIn a specialist resourced classroom / school
  • With pupils with other disabilities
  • In mainstream schools
  • In a combination of settings
  • At home

As parents, you should be fully involved in choosing the type of education provision and in choosing a particular school for your child.

Children who are multi-sensory impaired may receive support from teachers specialising in multi-sensory impairment and / or hearing or visual impairment, intervenors who are trained to work one-to-one with children, or other learning support assistants.

They may also be supported by physiotherapists, speech or occupational therapists, mobility specialists and / or nursing staff. It is vital that parents and professionals work together to meet your child's needs.

Most deafblind children and young people will have an Education, Health and Care plan (EHCP) that details the provision and resources required to meet their needs. The EHCP will be reviewed at least annually. Find out more about Education, Health and Care Plans.

More information is available on our curriculum and teaching strategies pages.

Help outside of school

Children who have sensory impairments are also entitled to support outside of school in order to be included in normal community activities. This entitlement comes from Department of Health guidance known as Deafblind Guidance or sometimes called section 7 guidance.

Transition

In year 9 (age 14) a transition plan plan must be developed for the child. This is designed to ensure that appropriate post-school provision is arranged, and that the transfer to adult service provision goes smoothly.

Transition planning should be multi-agency, involving social and health services. The plan should be reviewed and developed each year at the child’s annual review of their Education, Health and Care plan. The student and his or her family should be fully involved in the process.

If a multi-sensory-impaired young person is considering continuing their education beyond the end of their compulsory schooling then funding for post 16 education (Word document) needs to be considered.

In year 9 (age 14) a transition plan must be developed for the child. This is designed to ensure that appropriate post-school provision is arranged, and that the transfer to adult service provision goes smoothly.

Transition planning should be multi-agency, involving social and health services. The plan is reviewed and developed each year at the child's annual review. The student and his or her family should be fully involved in the process.

If a multi-sensory-impaired young person is considering continuing their education beyond the end of their compulsory schooling then funding for post 16 education (Word document) needs to be considered.

Further information

The SEND Code of Practice (link to PDF on UK Government website) is an important piece of guidance that describes how the SEND system should work for all the professionals who work within it. It is also a useful resource for families.

Advisory Centre for Education (ACE) website

Independent Panel for Special Education Advice (IPSEA) website

The Inclusion UK website

The law and transition

Getting a Result (support package)

Intervenors in action DVD

 

First published: Monday 21 May 2012
Updated: Monday 13 April 2015